Parenting News: Talking to Strangers, Pink for Boys, Healthy Eating, ADHD

Talking to Strangers? Rewriting the Rules of Childhood: We teach our children not to talk to strangers, but — as in Leiby’s case —sometimes they have to. After all, if they’re lost, how are my kids ever going to be found unless they first approach a stranger to lend them a cell phone so they can call me? (TIME.com)

For Young Boys, Is Pink the New Blue?: For generations the view has held strong that while girls must dress in pink to be girls, boys can’t do anything with pink, lest they turn into girls. It’s the view that’s determined the color scheme in many a kids’ bedroom, clothes and toy closets, and that has held strong through decades of change. But, in today’s 21st century world, is that view changing? (ABC News)

Happy Meal Gets a Makeover: The seemingly ubiquitous Happy Meals that have drawn the ire of health advocates and have been blamed for contributing to childhood obesity, will carry apple slices, reduced portion of french fries and a choice of beverage, including new fat-free chocolate milk and 1% low-fat white milk. (CNN.com)

Are Kids With ADHD More Likely to Get Hit By a Car?: Children with ADHD, by definition, are easily distracted and more prone to injuries. But a new study shows the condition could even be life-threatening since affected kids are more likely to be hit by a car when crossing the street. (TIME.com)

More Kids Eating Calorie-Packed Take-Out Food: The obesity epidemic is being fueled still further by a growing trend among kids to eat out and bring take-out food home, University of North Carolina researchers say. Such foods are high in sugar and calories, and their increasing popularity means youngsters are getting more calories than they need, the researchers noted.
(HealthDay)

Hey Kids, Is that Broccoli in Your Casserole?: A new study found that youngsters got more of their daily greens when researchers pureed veggies and added them to kids’ main dishes at breakfast, lunch, and dinner on the sly. And the kids didn’t seem to notice that anything was different — or to like the meals any less than non-veggie-packed fare. (Reuters)